FRANZ WOHLGEZOGEN

FRANZ WOHLGEZOGEN
Assistant Professor
Department of Management and Technology
 


Biographical note

B.A. in Business Economics, FOM, Essen, Germany (2004)
Ph.D. Candidate in Management and Organizations; Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (2014)


Academic CV

Lecturer at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern Law School, Northwestern School of Continuing Studies


Research areas

  • Governance and management of organizational networks
  • Evolution of organizations and organizational fields
  • Social entrepreneurship and philanthropy


Selected publications

  • Sasha Albers, Franz Wohlgezogen, and Ed Zajac (forthcoming). “Strategic alliance structures: an organization design perspective”, Journal of Management.
  • Ranjay Gulati, Franz Wohlgezogen, Pavel Zhelyazkov (2012) “The two facets of collaboration: cooperation and coordination in strategic alliances”, Academy of Management Annals, p1-53.
  • Don Haider, and Franz Wohlgezogen (2012) “Efficiency comes at a cost: balancing alliance partners’ mission and efficiency goals in Chicago’s Back Office Cooperative”, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 10 (1), p66-71.
  • Mary-Hunter Morris, Franz Wohlgezogen, Ed Zajac (2011) “Rich language for poor firms: the symbolic management of bankruptcy”, Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings.
  • Ranjay Gulati, Nitin Nohria, and Franz Wohlgezogen (2010) “Roaring out of a Recession”, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 88 Issue 3, p62-69.
  • William Ocasio, and Franz Wohlgezogen, F. (2010) “Attention and Control”, in: Sim Sitkin, Laura Cardinal, Katinka M. Bijlsma-Frankema (eds.) Organizational Control: New Directions in Theory and Research, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, p343-398.
  • Franz Wohlgezogen, and Paul Hirsch (2009) “Negotiating actor–environment relations: framework for comparative research”, in: Brayden King, B., Felin, T., Whetten, D. (eds.): Studying Differences between Organizations: Comparative Approaches to Organizational Research, Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Volume 26, p153–182.