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Course 2023-2024 a.y.

30153 - ORGANIZATION THEORY

Department of Management and Technology

Course taught in English



Go to class group/s: 31 - 32 - 33

BIEM (6 credits - I sem. - OBS)

Classes: 31 (I sem.) - 32 (I sem.)


Synchronous Blended: Lessons in synchronous mode in the classroom (for a maximum of one hour per credit in remote mode)

Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

“There is nothing so practical as a good theory” (Kurt Lewin, 1951) This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to organization theories. The aim is to strength the analytical skills of the participants and enable them to assess people behavior in work environments, organizations’ forms and structures and the root causes of their performance. This is a highly useful skill to cultivate for a wide variety of managerial roles and positions (marketing, operations, HR, finance & accounting, etc.). It is indispensable for working in a start-up or in a family business, for managing a company, consulting, auditing, and even investment banking. The course is based on the notion that satisfactorily understanding organizations requires the application of different lenses drawn from different disciplines including management studies, sociology, political science, economics, and psychology. Moreover, such an understanding also requires that we look at different levels within the organization. We emphasize both the behavioral processes (individual effectiveness, social interaction, groups, and teams) and the macro-level such as organizational design, organizational change, people management, and organizational culture. Mastering such a dialectic mindset is challenging but will allow participants to better understand and address complex organizational phenomena, and to become more aware of the limitations and dangers of simplistic and formulaic “solutions”

CONTENT SUMMARY
  • Motivation
  • Decision Making
  • Organizational Design and Structures
  • People Management
  • Organizational Culture

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...

This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to organization theories. The aim is to strength the analytical skills of the participants and enable them to assess people behavior in work environments, organizations’ forms and structures and the root causes of their performance. This is a highly useful skill to cultivate for a wide variety of managerial roles and positions (marketing, operations, HR, finance & accounting, etc.). It is indispensable for working in a start-up or in a family business, for managing a company, consulting, auditing, and even investment banking.

 

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Develop analytical skills
  • Develop models and conceptual schemes to different business realities
  • Assess people behaviour Analyze
  • Capacity to build a stronger organization
  • Increase people's motivation and satisfaction

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Online lectures
  • Case studies /Incidents (traditional, online)
  • Group assignments
  • Interactive class activities on campus/online (role playing, business game, simulation, online forum, instant polls)
DETAILS
  • In-class exercises to understand the language and to apply models and theory.
  • Theories and/or case studies discussions (in-class) to improve communication skills.
  • Oral presentations group assignments to improve public speaking skills.
  • Group assignments to learn how to apply theories to reality.

Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •     x
  • Individual assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  •     x
  • Group assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  •     x
  • Active class participation (virtual, attendance)
  •     x
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    To become attending, students should respect two conditions:

    1. field project assignment.
    2. Take the exam

     

    Assessment for attending students consists of their performance in the group field project and their performance in the final exam. The final exam is written and aims at ascertain the acquisition of knowledge and understanding. It is composed of one open questions (7 points each) a multiple-choice exam of 24 questions with four options each and just one correct answer. The exam will consist of a mix (i) pure theoretical questions and (ii) applications of models and theoretical concepts from the course materials, and is “closed-book”, “no-notes(i.e. no materials can be used during the exam). The exam is graded with a range of 0-31 points, with a fixed grade distribution based on the standard Bocconi undergrad grading policy (from 0/31 to 17/31 the exam is failed) and no penalization for wrong answers.

     

    Attending students that fail to submit the Group Field Project by the deadline will automatically become non-attending students

     

    Passing the course requires a final grade of minimum 18/31.

    The exam will last 50 minutes.

     

     

    Field Project. The aim of the Group Field Project (GFP) is to give the opportunity of applying theory to reality and, in particular, to real organizations. So that, each group has to find an interesting company or other type of organization and analyze it from an organizational frame, trying to use the concepts and the models that are presented during the course.

     

    Field Project Grading. The grade of the final project is composed of two parts.

    1. Written report. This part weights 70% of the grade. A non-exhaustive list of items that we will consider at the time of grading is:

    a. The report should be well-written,

    b. it should be much more than just a simple description, it should contain analysis.

    c. It should show the ability to relate different topics.

    2. Presentation. This part weights 30% of the grade. A non-exhaustive list of items that we will consider at the time of grading is:

    a. Clarity in the presentation,

    b. ability to answer questions during the presentation,

    c. ability to relate different topics of the class,

    d. quality of the slides used.

     

    Group’s composition and the case study chosen by each group should be determined by students.

     

    Each student group:

    1. Select an interesting and accessible case study (a company or other type of organization which sounds interesting regarding theories and models presented in class and it is possible to obtain detailed information about the internal organization)
    2. Writes a case report, which contains a description following a structure given in class (max. 10 pages, abstract, references, and appendixes excluded)
    3. Prepare and deliver a slide presentation in class (15 minutes for each group project) at the end of the course during the last 3 sessions.

     

    Groups will submit their written reports through the Black Board and in case of problem with the procedure by email to the TA and in copy to the instructor.

     

    Deadlines must be respected.

     

    In case attending students encounter problems with non-responsive or free-riding members in their group, and they are not able to resolve these problems with the group, they are invited to notify the instructor.

    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    For non-attending students, the assessment is based exclusively on their performance in the final exam.

    The final exam is a multiple-choice test (31 questions) and is “closed-book”, “no-notes(i.e. no materials can be used during the exam). Each question has four options with just one correct answer.

    The exam will consist of a mix of (i) pure theoretical questions and (ii) applications of models and theoretical concepts from a selected chapters in the textbook (listed below).

    It is graded with a range of 0-31 points, with a fixed grade distribution based on the standard Bocconi undergrad grading policy (from 0/31 to 17/31 the exam is failed) and no penalization for wrong answers.

     

    The exam will last 45 minutes.


    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The material for this course is a mix of slides provided by instructors and research and practitioner articles. In class, we will use slides topresent the main ideas and guide the discussion. The slides and the articles are posted on the e-learning platform (Blackboard). Students candownload copies directly from their computer and read them. In addition, case studies, role-playing and self-assessment exercises will be distributed in class, being part of the teaching material for the course. Notes taken in class are fundamental to integrate all the course materials provided by instructors.

     

    For students who prefer the guidance of a textbook, we recommend the following “course companion” textbooks:

     

    Managerial Economics and Organizational Architecture                                   

    James Brickley and Clifford Smith and Jerold Zimmerman (Authors)

    ISBN: 9781260571219
    Pub Date: 2021 
    Edition: 7th International Edition

    Publisher: Mc Graw Hill        

     

    This book can serve as a support for the attending students while it is mandatory for non-attending students. It can be useful because itincorporates most of the topics discussed in the course and places them into coherent intellectual contexts (in particular: Individual Effectiveness, Social Interactions, Groups, Teams and Leadership, Organizational Design and Organizational Change). Note, however, that for attending students this book is not a replacement for the assigned lecture notes and slides, as they may follow a different organization: someissues that we cover in-depth in the course in class receive only brief treatment in the book, and vice versa.

     

    Students can find the textbook at Egea bookshop.

    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Managerial Economics and Organizational Architecture                                   

    James Brickley and Clifford Smith and Jerold Zimmerman (Authors)

    ISBN: 9781260571219
    Pub Date: 2021 
    Edition: 7th International Edition

    Publisher: Mc Graw Hill        

     

    This book is mandatory for non-attending students. 

    Students can find the textbook at Egea bookshop.

    Last change 28/06/2023 17:35

    CLEF (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/10) - WBB (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/10) - BIEF (6 credits - II sem. - OP) - BIEM (6 credits - II sem. - OBS) - BIG (6 credits - II sem. - OP) - BEMACS (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/10) - BAI (6 credits - II sem. - OP)

    Classes: 33 (II sem.)
    Instructors:
    Class 33: ALBERTO MONTI


    Synchronous Blended: Lessons in synchronous mode in the classroom (for a maximum of one hour per credit in remote mode)

    Mission & Content Summary
    MISSION

    “There is nothing so practical as a good theory” (Kurt Lewin, 1951) This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to organization theories. The aim is to strength the analytical skills of the participants and enable them to assess people behavior in work environments, organizations’ forms and structures and the root causes of their performance. This is a highly useful skill to cultivate for a wide variety of managerial roles and positions (marketing, operations, HR, finance & accounting, etc.). It is indispensable for working in a start-up or in a family business, for managing a company, consulting, auditing, and even investment banking. The course is based on the notion that satisfactorily understanding organizations requires the application of different lenses drawn from different disciplines including management studies, sociology, political science, economics, and psychology. Moreover, such an understanding also requires that we look at different levels within the organization. We emphasize both the behavioral processes (individual effectiveness, social interaction, groups, and teams) and the macro-level such as organizational design, organizational change, people management, and organizational culture. Mastering such a dialectic mindset is challenging but will allow participants to better understand and address complex organizational phenomena, and to become more aware of the limitations and dangers of simplistic and formulaic “solutions”

    CONTENT SUMMARY
    • Motivation
    • Decision Making
    • Organizational Design and Structures
    • People Management
    • Organizational Culture

    Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
    KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
    At the end of the course student will be able to...

    This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to organization theories. The aim is to strength the analytical skills of the participants and enable them to assess people behavior in work environments, organizations’ forms and structures and the root causes of their performance. This is a highly useful skill to cultivate for a wide variety of managerial roles and positions (marketing, operations, HR, finance & accounting, etc.). It is indispensable for working in a start-up or in a family business, for managing a company, consulting, auditing, and even investment banking.

    APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
    At the end of the course student will be able to...
    • Develop analytical skills
    • Develop models and conceptual schemes to different business realities
    • Assess people behaviour Analyze
    • Capacity to build a stronger organization
    • Increase people's motivation and satisfaction

    Teaching methods
    • Face-to-face lectures
    • Online lectures
    • Case studies /Incidents (traditional, online)
    • Group assignments
    • Interactive class activities on campus/online (role playing, business game, simulation, online forum, instant polls)
    DETAILS
    • In-class exercises to understand the language and to apply models and theory.
    • Theories and/or case studies discussions (in-class) to improve communication skills.
    • Oral presentations group assignments to improve public speaking skills.
    • Group assignments to learn how to apply theories to reality.

    Assessment methods
      Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •     x
  • Individual assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  •     x
  • Group assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  •     x
  • Active class participation (virtual, attendance)
  •     x
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    To become attending, students should respect two conditions:

    1. field project assignment.
    2. Take the exam

     

    Assessment for attending students consists of their performance in the group field project and their performance in the final exam. The final exam is written and aims at ascertain the acquisition of knowledge and understanding. It is composed of one open questions (7 points each) a multiple-choice exam of 24 questions with four options each and just one correct answer. The exam will consist of a mix (i) pure theoretical questions and (ii) applications of models and theoretical concepts from the course materials, and is “closed-book”, “no-notes(i.e. no materials can be used during the exam). The exam is graded with a range of 0-31 points, with a fixed grade distribution based on the standard Bocconi undergrad grading policy (from 0/31 to 17/31 the exam is failed) and no penalization for wrong answers.

     

    Attending students that fail to submit the Group Field Project by the deadline will automatically become non-attending students

     

    Passing the course requires a final grade of minimum 18/31.

    The exam will last 50 minutes.

     

     

    Field Project. The aim of the Group Field Project (GFP) is to give the opportunity of applying theory to reality and, in particular, to real organizations. So that, each group has to find an interesting company or other type of organization and analyze it from an organizational frame, trying to use the concepts and the models that are presented during the course.

     

    Field Project Grading. The grade of the final project is composed of two parts.

    1. Written report. This part weights 70% of the grade. A non-exhaustive list of items that we will consider at the time of grading is:

    a. The report should be well-written,

    b. it should be much more than just a simple description, it should contain analysis.

    c. It should show the ability to relate different topics.

    2. Presentation. This part weights 30% of the grade. A non-exhaustive list of items that we will consider at the time of grading is:

    a. Clarity in the presentation,

    b. ability to answer questions during the presentation,

    c. ability to relate different topics of the class,

    d. quality of the slides used.

     

    Group’s composition and the case study chosen by each group should be determined by students.

     

    Each student group:

    1. Select an interesting and accessible case study (a company or other type of organization which sounds interesting regarding theories and models presented in class and it is possible to obtain detailed information about the internal organization)
    2. Writes a case report, which contains a description following a structure given in class (max. 10 pages, abstract, references, and appendixes excluded)
    3. Prepare and deliver a slide presentation in class (15 minutes for each group project) at the end of the course during the last 3 sessions.

     

    Groups will submit their written reports through the Black Board and in case of problem with the procedure by email to the TA and in copy to the instructor.

     

    Deadlines must be respected.

     

    In case attending students encounter problems with non-responsive or free-riding members in their group, and they are not able to resolve these problems with the group, they are invited to notify the instructor.

    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    For non-attending students, the assessment is based exclusively on their performance in the final exam.

    The final exam is a multiple-choice test (31 questions) and is “closed-book”, “no-notes(i.e. no materials can be used during the exam). Each question has four options with just one correct answer.

    The exam will consist of a mix of (i) pure theoretical questions and (ii) applications of models and theoretical concepts from a selected chapters in the textbook .

     

    It is graded with a range of 0-31 points, with a fixed grade distribution based on the standard Bocconi undergrad grading policy (from 0/31 to 17/31 the exam is failed) and no penalization for wrong answers.

     

    The exam will last 45 minutes.

     

     


    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The material for this course is a mix of slides provided by instructors and research and practitioner articles. In class, we will use slides topresent the main ideas and guide the discussion. The slides and the articles are posted on the e-learning platform (Blackboard). Students candownload copies directly from their computer and read them. In addition, case studies, role-playing and self-assessment exercises will be distributed in class, being part of the teaching material for the course. Notes taken in class are fundamental to integrate all the course materials provided by instructors.

     

    textbook will be communicated in class

     

     

     

    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Organizational Behavior Managing People and Organizations
    Ricky W. Griffin, Jean M. Philips and Stanley M. Gully (Authors)
    Imprint: South-Western
    Pub Date: 2016
    Edition: International Edition 12th Edition
    Publisher: Cengage Learning, Inc
    Published in: United States

    Last change 12/12/2023 10:13