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Course 2022-2023 a.y.

20672 - COMPARATIVE POLITICS: INSTITUTIONS AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Department of Social and Political Sciences

Course taught in English



Go to class group/s: 31

CLMG (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - M (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - IM (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - MM (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - AFC (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - CLELI (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - ACME (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - DES-ESS (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - EMIT (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - GIO (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - DSBA (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - PPA (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - FIN (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SPS/04)
Course Director:
GIOVANNA INVERNIZZI

Classes: 31 (I sem.)
Instructors:
Class 31: GIOVANNA INVERNIZZI


Suggested background knowledge

This course presents a broad and in-depth overview of the state of the art in comparative politics, i.e., the scientific study of the functioning of political institutions. Special attention is given to institutions and their relationship to development outcomes, paths to democratization and instability of regimes. The course is organized around four blocks: (1) elections and electoral systems; (2) types of executives and delegation of policymaking; (3) accountability and corruption; (4) political regimes and regime change. Emphasis is given to recent and provocative contributions; some more dated classics are included when needed.


Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

This course presents a broad and in-depth overview of the state of the art in comparative politics, i.e., the scientific study of the functioning of political institutions. Special attention is given to democratization and institutional change, the functioning of democratic regimes in developed and developing countries, and institutional reform. The course is organized around four blocks: political regimes and regime change; electoral systems; accountability and corruption; types of executives and delegation of policymaking to bureaucrats and sub-national governments. Emphasis is given to recent and provocative contributions; some more dated classics are included when needed.

CONTENT SUMMARY

1) Elections and Electoral Systems

  • The spatial model of politics. 
  • Proportional vs majoritarian electoral institutions: functioning and adoption.
  • Strategic voting. 
  • Political agency models of elections.

(2) Political Parties

Why parties?

  • The role of intra-party factions and party organization.
  • Electoral institutions and party system change.

(3) Types of executives and delegation of policymaking

  • A model of pandering. Presidential vs parliamentary systems.
  • Federalism and decentralization.

(4) Accountability, corruption and governance

  • Electoral control. 
  • Lobbies and mafias. 
  • Political vs. bureaucratic corruption. 
  • Clientelism and vote buying.
  • Consequences of corruption and anti-corruption policies.

(5) Political Regimes and Regime Change

  • State building and state capacity. 
  • Transitions to democracy.
  • Authoritarian regimes and limited authoritarian government. 
  • Democratic consolidation. 
  • Regime types and economic growth.

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Illustrate the central methodological and substantive insights that the scientific study of political institutions provides
  • Understand how different political incentives affect election outcomes
  • Describe the differences between democracies and autocracies
  • Identify the consequences of different types of political institutions on economic performance, politicians’ behavior and party systems.
APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Distinguish between transition to democracies and other types of alternation in power
  • Describe the expected consequences of institutional reforms in specific real-world settings.

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
DETAILS

Each lecture revolves around one or two papers, which are going to be dissected in detail, in order to understand the mechanics and the logic of the model (for theoretical contributions) and the data and empirical strategy (for empirical contributions). Active participation, based on having read the paper(s) in advance of the relevant lecture, is expected.


Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •   x x
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Students can decide whether to sit two partials or only one general exam.

     

    PARTIALS

    There are two requirements.

    1. The first is a partial in-class exam, covering the first half of the course.
    2. The second is a final exam, covering only the second half of the course. Each of the partial exams is worth 50% of the grade.

    In the exam, students need to demonstrate their knowledge of the theoretical models and empirical contributions covered in class, and their ability to evaluate hypothetical specific cases in light of the material presented in the course.     

     

    GENERAL

    There is one requirement: a final exam, covering the entire course material. The final exam is worth 100% of the grade.

    In the exam, students need to demonstrate their knowledge of the theoretical models and empirical contributions covered in class, and their ability to evaluate hypothetical specific cases in light of the material presented in the course


    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS
    • There is no textbook for this course. 

     

    • Each lecture revolves around one or two papers, which are going to be dissected in detail, in order to understand the mechanics and the logic of the model (for theoretical contributions) and the data and empirical strategy (for empirical contributions). Papers and book chapters are made available via the Bocconi e-learning platform.

     

    • Students who need extra background or prefer to consult a textbook treatment to organize ideas can refer to: CLARK, WILLIAM R. MATT GOLDER, SONA N. GOLDER, Principles of Comparative Politics, CQ Press 2013, second edition. (Please notice that the textbook is not a substitute for the assigned papers and articles. This is particularly true for students who decide not to attend the lectures: studying the Clark et al. book is not sufficient –and not necessary– to successfully pass the exam).
    Last change 08/06/2022 15:13