Info
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Course 2018-2019 a.y.

30313 - ECONOMICS OF INSTITUTIONS AND CULTURE

Department of Economics

Course taught in English


Go to class group/s: 31

CLEAM (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/02) - CLEF (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/02) - BESS-CLES (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/02) - WBB (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/02) - BIEF (6 credits - II sem. - OBCURS  |  SECS-P/02) - BIEM (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/02) - BEMACS (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/02)

Classes: 31 (II sem.)
Instructors:
Class 31: MARA PASQUAMARIA SQUICCIARINI


Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

How do institutions and culture affect economic outcomes? This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to cultural and political economics. The course examines competing hypotheses on the role of geography, institutions, and culture for long-term economic growth and cross-country differences in economic outcomes. It then focuses on the role of religion for the accumulation of human capital and economic progress. The course also analyzes how ethnic diversity and ethnic conflicts may impact economic development. Finally, it explores the patterns of diffusion of innovations and ideas, their interaction with local culture and institutions, and it provides different views on the future of technological progress and economic development.

CONTENT SUMMARY
  • The Role of Geography for Growth and Development.
  • The Role of Institutions for Growth and Development.
  • The Role of Culture for Growth and Development.
  • The 1st Industrial Revolution and the beginning of modern economic growth: geography, institutions, and culture.
  • Religion, Human Capital, and Economic Outcomes.
  • Ethnic diversity and ethnic conflicts.
  • Globalization: flows of goods and flows of technology.
  • Flows of ideas and their interaction with local culture and institutions.

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Understand the different hypotheses on the role of geography, institutions, and culture for economic progress.
  • Understand the role of religion (and religiosity) for accumulation of human capital and economic growth.
  • Understand the roots and drivers of ethnic conflict.
  • Understand the patterns of diffusion of innovations and ideas, as well as their impact on economic development.
APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Critically compare the different hypotheses on the role of geography, institutions, and culture for economic development.
  • Evaluate the consequences of religion (and religiosity) for economic development across time and space.
  • Evaluate the consequences of ethnic conflicts.
  • Evaluate how technological progress and innovative ideas interact with local culture and institutions.

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Guest speaker's talks (in class or in distance)
  • Group assignments
DETAILS

This course is based on in-class lectures by the professors, along with one or more talks by guest lecturers who are leading scholars in the field of political economics or economic history. Students also are asked to prepare one group presentation on a research paper at the frontier of the field. These presentations are used for the student assessment, and provide a basis for a discussion of the papers in class, during which students are encouraged to bring their own views and to share their insights on the most significant, controversial or innovative aspects of the research project.


Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •   x x
  • Group assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  • x    
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Students can choose to be evaluated in two alternative ways: (1) via coursework, or (2) via a general exam.

    1. Coursework: following this track, students are tested on compulsory readings, and on the material discussed in class. The final grade is the sum of the three components: a partial (max. 15 points), a final exam (max. 15 points), and a group presentation (0 to 2 points). The partial and the final exam are based on compulsory readings, and on the material discussed in class. The partial tests knowledge of the first half of the course, while the final tests knowledge of the second half. Both exams include multiple choice and open questions. Students are presented with one more open questions than those that need to be answered, so they are able to choose those topics/questions where they feel most comfortable with.
    2. General Exam: following this track, students are assessed based on compulsory readings and material discussed in class. The final grade is the grade of the exam (max. 31 points). The test includes both multiple choice and open questions, and it is not be possible to choose the questions to be answered.

    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Teaching materials (syllabus, papers and class slides) are uploaded on the Bboard platform for this class.

    Last change 20/06/2018 12:25