Info
Logo Bocconi

Course 2018-2019 a.y.

20475 - EVENT AND MEGA EVENT MANAGEMENT AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

Department of Marketing

Course taught in English


Go to class group/s: 31

CLMG (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - M (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - IM (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - MM (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - AFC (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - CLEFIN-FINANCE (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - CLELI (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - ACME (6 credits - I sem. - OBS  |  SECS-P/08) - DES-ESS (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  12 credits SECS-P/08) - EMIT (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08) - GIO (6 credits - I sem. - OP  |  SECS-P/08)

Classes: 31 (I sem.)
Instructors:
Class 31: DEBORAH CAROLINA RACCAGNI


Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

The course deals with events as business communication instruments. Available statistics show that the share of the promotional budget invested in events is on the rise for a variety of industries and product groups in Europe, North America and the Asia-Pacific region. Furthermore, given the growing importance of experiential marketing in order to attract customers in both B2B and B2C settings, event management represents one of the most dynamic, rewarding and genuinely enjoyable area of all contemporary industries.

CONTENT SUMMARY
  • Event industries: actors and competencies.
  • Fundamental decisions: goal setting, targets, messages, budgeting.
  • The event management process (the company and the agency’s points of view).
  • Measuring event results.
  • Mega events.
  • Creative and Entertainment industries (theme parks, sport, cinema).
  • Audiences and fans.

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Understand the event industries and the role covered by its relevant actors such as event agencies; a deep knowledge about their competencies in event project management will be also acquired.
  • Deal with the most fundamental decisions from goal setting, targets, messages and budgeting. Students will know the most relevant metrics for the measurement of event efficacy.
  • Recognize peculiarities related mega events and creative and entertainment industries (theme parks, sport, cinema) will be presented, introducing the role of audiences and fans.  
APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Design events for different purposes, target and industries. Students will be able to compute and discuss the most relevant KPI for the measurement of event results. They will be able to assess the right balance between creativity and planning; reinforcing their ability  to work in team and communicate.

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Guest speaker's talks (in class or in distance)
  • Case studies /Incidents (traditional, online)
  • Group assignments
DETAILS
  • Guest Speaker's talk: introducing case studies and real life experiences.
  • Showcasing the different professions within an event agency.
  • Case studies: actively engaging students in figuring out the key principles by abstracting from the examples. This develops their skills in problem solving, data analysis, decision making in complex situations.
  • Group assignment allowing students to concretely deal with a real event project from design to implementation, under specific constraints determined by the industry, the brand and the budget.

Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •     x
  • Group assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  •     x
  • Peer evaluation
  •     x
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Assessment methods are based on two elements:

    1. Field project: 60%
    2. Final exam: 40%
      1. The field project consists of developing an event based project. The project must involve several areas from target analysis, creative concept definition and event management planning. These areas are presented in detail at the launch of the competition along with the assessment criteria. Managers from the company sponsoring the project provides qualitative feedback to all the groups and select a winner. This project is used to verify the ability of students to apply the knowledge developed during the course and assess the ability to complete an event and how to present it effectively. At their discretion, individual groups may request to integrate the faculty assessment with a peer evaluation (optional).
      2. The exam is held in written form. It is made up of several short contextualized open-ended questions, which must be disentangled by students, in addition to several open-ended and multiple-choice questions referring to the concepts, models and cases discussed in class. The short contextualized open-ended questions are used to assess the ability to apply the knowledge students learn during the course. The open-ended and multiple-choice questions are mainly aimed at verifying learning of the analytical and management abilities and their correct comprehension.
    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The assessment method for non-attending students is based on a final exam in written form. It is made up of several open-ended and multiple-choice questions referring to the concepts, models and cases contained in the textbooks and exam materials. The open-ended and multiple-choice questions are mainly aimed at verifying learning of the analytical and management abilities and their correct comprehension. The business cases are used to assess the ability to apply the knowledge students learned when studying the course material.


    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING STUDENTS
    • D. RINALLO, (ed.), Event Marketing, LATERZA, Milan, 2017 (selected chapters).
    • Additional readings and documents as indicated in the syllabus, available from the course reserve page or Bboard.
    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS
    • D. RINALLO, (ed.), Event Marketing, LATERZA, 2017 (entire book).
    • A. LIEBERMAN, The Definitive Guide to Entertainment Marketing Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2013. 
    Last change 10/06/2018 12:44