Info
Logo Bocconi

Course 2018-2019 a.y.

20472 - HERITAGE MANAGEMENT

ACME
Department of Social and Political Sciences

Course taught in English


Go to class group/s: 31

ACME (6 credits - I sem. - OBS  |  4 credits L-ART/04  |  2 credits SECS-P/07)
Course Director:
JANE THOMPSON

Classes: 31 (I sem.)
Instructors:
Class 31: JANE THOMPSON


Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

The sheer diversity of heritage typologies together with contrasting management environments and diverse and often entrenched values by a range of stakeholders (given strong territorial links of immoveable cultural heritage) make for a lot of complexity. There is a specific focus in the course on the struggle within the cultural heritage sector to find effective ways to measure success, both in terms of achieving desired outcomes but also in terms of improving the performance of heritage management models.

CONTENT SUMMARY

The emphasis of the course is on:

  • Cultural heritage places (rather than collections and the museum sector which are addressed in other courses, although with obvious links).
  • Understanding, defining, assessing management systems for cultural heritage in order to promote improvement within them.
  • Achieving a more dynamic role for cultural heritage in broader sustainable development to harness benefits both for heritage and for broader wellbeing in society.

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Comprehend the diversity of heritage places and 'unpick' cultural significance and people-centred approaches in the context of managing shared assets.
  • Understand, define and assesse management systems for heritage places with a view to identifying and introducing improvements for greater management effectiveness.
  • Comprehend the implications of a more dynamic role for cultural heritage in broader sustainable development to harness benefits both for heritage and for broader wellbeing in society and able to tune management approaches and adopt tools to this end.

 

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Unite his or her diverse background, often with strengths in economics, business and the wider arts sector, with a better understanding of the cultural heritage sector in order to make him or her a prime candidate for interdisciplinary cultural leadership roles.
  • Act as future mediators for management innovation in the cultural heritage sector, a field that has been somewhat isolated and self-referential for too long and is in great need of stronger inter-sectorial not just interdisciplinary approaches.

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Guest speaker's talks (in class or in distance)
  • Company visits
  • Exercises (exercises, database, software etc.)
  • Case studies /Incidents (traditional, online)
  • Individual assignments
  • Group assignments
  • Interactive class activities (role playing, business game, simulation, online forum, instant polls)
DETAILS
  • The course draws on real life case studies from around the world, together with progress made in the development of new approaches and methodologies - often in the context of ICCROM policy work for World Heritage. These are come together to allow the students to explore some common theoretical frameworks, identify what is happening at real heritage sites, promote a common language and identify their own capacity to improve practice in the field.
  • The case studies adopted by the students as course work help explore management issues raised by multiple ownership, complex governance, conflicting values and the relationship of immoveable cultural heritage to surrounding communities and society as a whole.
  • Guest lecturers are a fundamental element of the course, presenting the challenges faced by professionals in the field. External visits to heritage places, including contact with the organizations and communities involved in their management, allow a first-hand understanding of how they work behind the scenes.
  • The coursework components are the real core of the course - the delivery of a project on specific topics introduced during the first weeks of the course and advanced through individual and group work and class workshops. The approach roots the study environment in peer-learning and ensures that students fully interact with course content and can apply it to real world scenarios. The course work is structured to reinforce the ability of students with diverse backgrounds to understand the broad issues and peculiarities of managing immoveable cultural heritage worldwide, while the exam questions further reinforce these themes focusing in more detail on specific management issues and capacity-building approaches. Active class participation is vital and this course is less rewarding and effective for non-attending students.
  • Key texts and other suggested bibliography for attending and not attending students are provided in a Course Readings summary integrated into the Syllabus document at the beginning of the course. A greater number of key texts are identified for non-attending students.
  • Similarly, course presentations offered during classroom sessions and external visits, together with other essential reading indicated during the course, are uploaded weekly on to the course learning area on the Bocconi portal and are significant for attending and non-attending students alike.

Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •   x  
  • Individual assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  • x x  
  • Group assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  • x x  
  • Active class participation (virtual, attendance)
  • x x  
  • Peer evaluation
  • x    
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The status of attending student is recognized in the first two calendar exams. The students who attend the course get a final grade which brings together the following results:

    • Independent individual research (40% of overall course evaluation). A case study and themes are chosen in agreement with the Course Director; summary findings then are shared in the form of a short presentation to the class.
    • Comparative case study analysis (10% of overall course evaluation). Students are divided into small groups to advance the tasks and then present and discuss their findings with their peers: the emphasis on contrasts between case studies constitute vital steps to understanding the diverse management implications of each heritage typology and management environment.
    • A final written exam (50% of overall course evaluation) on subjects covered in the:
      • Course presentations, including those offered during external visits.
      • Key texts and other suggested reading identified in the Course Readings.
      • Outcomes of the coursework of the entire class.
      • Any other essential reading indicated during the course.
    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Non-attending students can take all available exams. The final grade is based on:

    • A written exam (100% of overall course evaluation) on subjects covered in the:
      • Course presentations, including those offered during external visits.
      • Key texts and other suggested reading identified in the Course Readings.
      • Any other essential reading indicated during the course.

    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The exam is in written form, last 120 minutes and it is open book. It is structured aroud a series of questions, in some cases with a selection from which the student can choose. The questions are primarily based on the material presented in the classes and the following readings (where possible they are issued in parallel on e-learning):

    • ALBERT, MARIE-THERES, M. RICHON, M.J. VINALS (eds) et al., Community development through world Heritage, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage papers 31, 2012 http://whc.unesco.org/documents/publi_wh_papers_31_en.pdf
    • F.P. MCMANAMON, A. HATTON (eds), Cultural Resource management in Contemporary Society, New York, USA, Routledge, 2009, preface pp.xiii-xv and introduction pp.1-19 (first section provided by lecturer in pdf format).
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, S. COURT, Engaging communities and developing capacities for Heritage, in G. CHITTY (eds), heritage, conversation and communities: engagement and capacity building, UK, Routledge, 2016 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, C. YOUNG, Managing cultural world Heritage, UNESCO, 2013, chapters 2, 3 & 4 in particular but also the Appendix on management planning http://whc.unesco.org/en/resourcemanuals/
    • Presentation and adoption of the World Heritage strategy for capacity building, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Centre, 2011 (Doc WHC-11/35.COM/9B) http://whc.unesco.org/archive/2011/whc11-35com-9Be.pdf

    During the course, results of some unpublished ICCROM research projects are also presented and, in this cases, the bibliography available is limited and reference must be made to presentations uploaded on the portal. The following additionla readings enhance knowledge for exam sittings for all non-attending students (even if they choose the course option). The following additional readings reinforce coursework for atteding students.

    • G. BOCCARDI, From mitigation to adaptation: A new Heritage Paradigm for the Anthropocene in Albert, M-T (ed), Perceprion of sustainability in Heritage Studies, Heritage Studies-Degruyter 4: 87-98, 2015
    • Heritage Counts produced annually by Historic England on behalf of the Historic Enviroment Forum http://historicengland.org.uk/research/heritage-counts/
    • L. SULLIVAN, A. LEESON, D. BADE (ed), Heritage Counts 2016 England, Historic England, UK, 2015.
    • E. CLARE, D.MELVILLE, A. STACEY (ed), Heritage Counts 2014 England, English Heritage, UK. 
    • L. MESKELL, Global Heritage: a reader, Wiley-Blackwell,  2015,  http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118768868.html

    The following readings are for those students interested in pushing their knowledge and understanding further:

    • ALBERT, MARIE-THERES, M. RICHON, M.J. VINALS, et al. (eds), Community development through World Heritage, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Papers 31, 2012, http://whc.unesco.org/documents/publi_wh_papers_31_en.pdf
    • G. AMARESWAR (ed.), World Heritage: benefits Beyond Borders, UNESCO/Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012.
    • S. BAIA CURIONI, Ercolano Felix, Rapporto Annuale Fondazioni 2011 - Il giornale dell'Arte, Allemandi, 2011. 
    • F. BANDARIN, J. HOSAGRAHAR, F. SAILER ALBERNAZ, Why development needs culture, Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, Vol. 1 Issue 1. Emerald, Groupe: pp. 15-25, 2011, N.B. Also, browse other editions of this journal edited by A. PEREIRA RODERS, R. VAN OERS.
    •  L. BECK, T. CABLE, Interpretation for the 21st Century: 15 Guiding principles for Interpreting Nature and Culture, Champaign, Sagamore Publishing, 1998.
    • G. BLACK, The Engaging Museum: developing Museums For Visitor involvement, London, Routledge, 2005.
    • G. BOCCARDI, From mitigation to adaptation: A new heritage Pradigm for the Anthropocene in Albert, M-T (ed) Perceprions of Sustainability in Heritage Studies, Heritage Studies - Degruyter 4:87-98, 2015 (provided by lecturer on request)
    • J. BROWN, T. HAY-EDIE, Engaging local communities in stewarship of World Heritage. A methodology based on the COMPACT experience, Paris, France, UNESCO World Heritage papers, 40, 2014, http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002303/230372e.pdf
    • L. BROCHU, T. MERRIMAN, Put the HEART, Back in Your Community: community experience planning, Fort Collins, CO, Heartfelt Publications, 2011.
    • K. CLARK (ed.), Capturing the Public Value of Heritage. The procedings of London, Conference: English heritage Kemble, Drive, 2006. http://culturalheritagevalues.com/capturing-the-public-value-of-heritage-conference/
    • S. COURT, J. THOMPSON, C. BIGGI, Recognizing the interdependent relationship between heritage and its wider context, in J. BRIDGLAND (ed), Preprints of the 16th ICOM-CC Triennial Conference, Lisbon, 19-23 September 2011, Almada, ICOM.
    • M. DE LA TORRE (ed.), Heritage Values in Site Management Four Case Studies, USA, J. Paus Getty Trust, 2005.
    • D. HALL, G. RICHARDS (eds), Tourism and Sustainable Community Development, Abingdon, Routledge, 2003.
    • J. HOLDEN, Cultural Value and the Crisis of Legitumacy, Demos, 2006, http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/culturallegitimacy.
    • W. LOGAN, N.C. MAIREAD, U.KOCKEL (eds), A companion to heritage Studies, Wiley-blackwell, 2015 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118486668.html.
    • K. LITHGOW, Sustainable decision making-change in National Trust collections conservation, Jornal of Istitute of Conservation, 2011, Vol. 34, No. 1, 130-144, Routledge (provided as pdf).
    • V. MAGAR, (forthcoming), Managing rock art sites in the Sieraa de San Francisco, Baja California, Mexico, in Herculaneum Centre (ed.) Heritage Site Management Practices, ICCROM, (provided by lecturer on request).
    • R. MASON, Economics and Heritage Conservation Getty Conservation Istitute, 1999, http://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/pdf_publications/economics_and_heritage.html.
    • F.P. MCMANAMON, A. HATTON, Cultural Resource Management in Contemporary Society, New York, USA, Routledge, 2009, preface pp.xiii-xv and introduction pp.1-19 (provided as pdf).
    • L. MESKELL, Global Heritage, a reader, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118768868.html.
    • MORRIS, HARGREAVES, MCINTYRE, Never mind the width, feel the quality, London, 2005 http://www.lateralthinkers.com/resources/Comment/Never-mind-the-width.pdf.
    • PLB, Deveoping New Audiences for Heritage, London, HLF (provided by lecturer in pdf format on request), 2001.
    • A. RE (ed), Evaluating the management of UNESCO sites, Celid, Torino, 2012 (English abstract of Italian Volume provided by lecurer on request).
    • K.A. SABLE, R. KLING, The double public good: a conceptual framework for shared experience values associatted with Heritage conservation, Journal of Cultural Economics 25, 2001, pp. 77-89.
    • E. STEELE, Cultural heritage policy Documents, the Getty Conservation Istitute, 2009, http://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/research_resources/charters.html.
    • J. THOMPSON, Conservation & management challenges in a public-private initiative for a large archaeological site (Herculaneum, Italy), Conservation & Management of Archaelogical Site, 2008, 8.4: pp. 191-204 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Presentation and adoption of the World heritage strategy for capacity building, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Doc WHC-11/35.COM/9B), 2011 http://whc.unesco.org/archive/2011/whc11-35com-9Be.pdf.
    • E. WATERTON, S. WATSON, Heritage and Community Engagement, London, Routledge, 2013. 
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, S. COURT, Engaging Communities and developing capacities for Heritage, in G. CHITTY (ed.), heritage, Conservation and Communities: engagement and capacity building, UK, Routledge, 2016 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, C. YOUNG, Managing Cultural world Heritage, Resource Manual, UNESCO, 2013, Chapter 2,3 & 4 in particular http://whc.unesco.org/en/resourcemanuals/
    • C. YOUNG (in press), The management context (chapter 3), The need for management Plan and the first and second plans (chapter 4) in P. STONE, D. BROUGH (ed), Managing, using and interpreting Hadrian's Wall as World Heritage, Springer. 
    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The exam is written form, last 120 minutes and is open book. It is structured around a series of questions, in some cases with a selection from which the student can choose. Non attending students are required to complete more complete and exhaustive responses, and to additional questions that also cover the issues addresses by attending studens during the coursework. The questions are primarily based on the material presented in the classes and the following readings (where possible they are issued in parallel on e-learning):

    • ALBERT, MARIE-THERES, M. RICHON, M.J. VINALS (eds) et al., Community development through world Heritage, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage papers 31, 2012 http://whc.unesco.org/documents/publi_wh_papers_31_en.pdf.
    • F.P. MCMANAMON, A. HATTON (eds), Cultural Resource management in Contemporary Society, New York, USA, Routledge, 2009, preface pp.xiii-xv and introduction pp.1-19 (first section provided by lecturer in pdf format).
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, S. COURT, Engaging communities and developing capacities for Heritage, in G. CHITTY (eds), heritage, conversation and communities: engagement and capacity building, UK, Routledge, 2016 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, C. YOUNG, Managing cultural world Heritage, UNESCO, 2013, chapters 2, 3 & 4 in particular but also the Appendix on management planning http://whc.unesco.org/en/resourcemanuals/
    • Presentation and adoption of the World Heritage strategy for capacity building, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Centre, 2011 (Doc WHC-11/35.COM/9B) http://whc.unesco.org/archive/2011/whc11-35com-9Be.pdf

    During the course, results of some unpublished ICCROM research projects are also presented and, in this cases, the bibliography available is limited and reference must be made to presentations uploaded on the portal. The following additionla readings enhance knowledge for exam sittings for all non-attending students (even if they choose the course option). The following additional readings reinforce coursework for atteding students.

    • G. BOCCARDI, From mitigation to adaptation: A new Heritage Paradigm for the Anthropocene in Albert, M-T (ed), Perceprion of sustainability in Heritage Studies, Heritage Studies-Degruyter 4: 87-98, 2015.
    • Heritage Counts produced annually by Historic England on behalf of the Historic Enviroment Forum http://historicengland.org.uk/research/heritage-counts/
    • L. SULLIVAN, A. LEESON, D. BADE (ed), Heritage Counts 2016 England, Historic England, UK, 2015.
    • E. CLARE, D.MELVILLE, A. STACEY (ed), Heritage Counts 2014 England, English Heritage, UK. 
    • L. MESKELL, Global Heritage: a reader, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015,  http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118768868.html.

    The following readings are for those students interested in pushing their knowledge and understanding further:

    • ALBERT, MARIE-THERES, M. RICHON, M.J. VINALS, et al. (eds), Community development through World Heritage, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Papers 31, 2012, http://whc.unesco.org/documents/publi_wh_papers_31_en.pdf.
    • G. AMARESWAR (ed.), World Heritage: benefits Beyond Borders, UNESCO/Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012.
    • S. BAIA CURIONI, Ercolano Felix, Rapporto Annuale Fondazioni 2011- Il giornale dell'Arte, Allemandi, 2011. 
    • F. BANDARIN, J. HOSAGRAHAR, F. SAILER ALBERNAZ, Why development needs culture, Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, Vol. 1 Issue 1. Emerald, Groupe: pp. 15-25, 2011, N.B. Also, browse other editions of this journal edited by A. PEREIRA RODERS, R. VAN OERS.
    •  L. BECK, T. CABLE, Interpretation for the 21st Century: 15 Guiding principles for Interpreting Nature and Culture, Champaign, Sagamore Publishing, 1998.
    • G. BLACK, The Engaging Museum: developing Museums For Visitor involvement, London, Routledge, 2005.
    • G. BOCCARDI, From mitigation to adaptation: A new heritage Pradigm for the Anthropocene in Albert, M-T (ed) Perceprions of Sustainability in Heritage Studies, Heritage Studies - Degruyter 4:87-98, 2015 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • J. BROWN, T. HAY-EDIE, Engaging local communities in stewarship of World Heritage. A methodology based on the COMPACT experience, Paris, France, UNESCO World Heritage papers, 40, 2014, http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002303/230372e.pdf.
    • L. BROCHU, T. MERRIMAN, Put the HEART, Back in Your Community: community experience planning, Fort Collins, CO, Heartfelt Publications, 2011.
    • K. CLARK (ed.), Capturing the Public Value of Heritage. The procedings of London, Conference: English heritage Kemble, Drive, 2006. http://culturalheritagevalues.com/capturing-the-public-value-of-heritage-conference/.
    • S. COURT, J. THOMPSON, C. BIGGI, Recognizing the interdependent relationship between heritage and its wider context, in J. BRIDGLAND (ed), Preprints of the 16th ICOM-CC Triennial Conference, Lisbon, 19-23 September 2011, Almada, ICOM.
    • M. DE LA TORRE (ed.), Heritage Values in Site Management Four Case Studies, USA, J. Paus Getty Trust, 2005.
    • D. HALL, G. RICHARDS (eds), Tourism and Sustainable Community Development, Abingdon, Routledge, 2003.
    • J. HOLDEN, Cultural Value and the Crisis of Legitumacy, Demos, 2006, http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/culturallegitimacy.
    • W. LOGAN, N.C. MAIREAD, U.KOCKEL (eds), A companion to heritage Studies, Wiley-blackwell, 2015 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118486668.html.
    • K. LITHGOW, Sustainable decision making-change in National Trust collections conservation, Jornal of Istitute of Conservation, 2011, Vol. 34, No. 1, 130-144, Routledge (provided as pdf).
    • V. MAGAR, (forthcoming), Managing rock art sites in the Sieraa de San Francisco, Baja California, Mexico, in Herculaneum Centre (ed.) Heritage Site Management Practices, ICCROM, (provided by lecturer on request).
    • R. MASON, Economics and Heritage Conservation Getty Conservation Istitute, 1999, http://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/pdf_publications/economics_and_heritage.html.
    • F.P. MCMANAMON, A. HATTON, Cultural Resource Management in Contemporary Society, New York, USA, Routledge, 2009, preface pp.xiii-xv and introduction pp.1-19 (provided as pdf).
    • L. MESKELL, Global Heritage, a reader, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118768868.html.
    • MORRIS, HARGREAVES, MCINTYRE, Never mind the width, feel the quality, London, 2005 http://www.lateralthinkers.com/resources/Comment/Never-mind-the-width.pdf.
    • PLB, Deveoping New Audiences for Heritage, London, HLF (provided by lecturer in pdf format on request), 2001.
    • A. RE (ed), Evaluating the management of UNESCO sites, Celid, Torino, 2012 (English abstract of Italian Volume provided by lecurer on request).
    • K.A. SABLE, R. KLING, The double public good: a conceptual framework for shared experience values associatted with Heritage conservation, Journal of Cultural Economics 25, 2001, pp. 77-89.
    • E. STEELE, Cultural heritage policy Documents, the Getty Conservation Istitute, 2009, http://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/research_resources/charters.html.
    • J. THOMPSON, Conservation & management challenges in a public-private initiative for a large archaeological site (Herculaneum, Italy), Conservation & Management of Archaelogical Site, 2008, 8.4: pp. 191-204 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Presentation and adoption of the World heritage strategy for capacity building, Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Doc WHC-11/35.COM/9B), 2011 http://whc.unesco.org/archive/2011/whc11-35com-9Be.pdf.
    • E. WATERTON, S. WATSON, Heritage and Community Engagement, London, Routledge, 2013. 
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, S. COURT, Engaging Communities and developing capacities for Heritage, in G. CHITTY (ed.), heritage, Conservation and Communities: engagement and capacity building, UK, Routledge, 2016 (provided by lecturer on request).
    • G. WIJESURIYA, J. THOMPSON, C. YOUNG, Managing Cultural world Heritage, Resource Manual, UNESCO, 2013, Chapter 2,3 & 4 in particular http://whc.unesco.org/en/resourcemanuals/.
    • C. YOUNG (in press), The management context (chapter 3), The need for management Plan and the first and second plans (chapter 4) in P. STONE, D. BROUGH (ed), Managing, using and interpreting Hadrian's Wall as World Heritage, Springer. 
    Last change 26/06/2018 09:29