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TAMAS VONYO

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Assistant Professor
Department of Social and Political Sciences
 

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Courses a.y. 2019/2020

30067 STORIA ECONOMICA / ECONOMIC HISTORY
30530 GLOBAL ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY

Courses previous a.y.


Biographical note

Born September 7th, 1979. Masters degree in Economic and Social History from Oxford University.
PhD in Economic and Social History from Oxford University.


Academic CV

Assistant Professor, Bocconi University, since October 2014 

Assistant Professor, London School of Economics, 2012-2014

Post-doctoral research fellow, Groningen University, 2010-2012


Research areas

Economic history of Germany and Eastern Europe, comparative industrial performance, the economics of the world wars, and socialist economic development.


Publications



SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Monograph

The Economic Consequences of the War: West Germany's Growth Miracle after 1945, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

Articles in peer reviewed journals

‘Why did socialist economies fail: The role of factor inputs reconsidered’ (with Alex Klein), Economic History Review, published online in May 2018.

'War and Socialism: Why Eastern Europe Fell Behind Between 1950 and 1989', Economic History Review, vol. 70, 1 (2017), pp. 248-270.

‘The Wartime Origins of the Wirtschaftswunder: The Growth of West German Industry, 1938-1955’, Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte, vol. 55, 2 (2014), pp. 129-158.

‘The Roots of Economic Failure: What Explains East Germany’s Falling Behind between 1945 and 1950?’ (with Albrecht Ritschl), European Review or Economic History, vol. 18, 2 (2014), pp. 166-184.

‘The Bombing of Germany: The Economic Geography of War-Induced Dislocation in West German Industry’, European Review of Economic History, vol. 16, 1 (2012), pp. 97-118.

‘Socialist Industrialisation or Post-War Reconstruction: Understanding Hungarian Economic Growth, 1949-1967’, Journal of European Economic History, vol. 39, 2 (2010), pp. 253-300.

‘Post-War Reconstruction and the Golden Age of Economic Growth’, European Review of Economic History, vol. 12, 2 (2008), pp. 221-241.